The Global View

The Pepsi sustainability challenge

315057_wall_2.jpgPepsi-Cola, “a recognized leader in sustainability” according to its publicity machine, has managed to produce its lightest bottle yet to hold its ‘flavoured non-carbonated beverages’ (that’s ‘still drinks’ to you and me).

Why should you care? Well, it means the 500ml contained will actually contain 20 percent less plastic and therefore will result in a reduction of 20 million pounds of waste.

Watch out for the new bottles of Lipton Iced Tea, Tropicana juices and Aquafina from the end of May.

Here’s what Robert Lewis, the company’s head of packaging said about it: “The challenge was to deliver significantly lighter packaging that would provide the same shelf life as the heavier bottle, withstand the manufacturing and distribution process yet not compromise aesthetics. After a full year of hard work from multiple corners of the company, we hit the trifecta— a bottle that satisfied the needs of our system, our consumers and the environment.”

Greenbang wonders why Pepsi wasn’t doing this before if they really are sustainability leaders… And Pepsi, how much water does it take to make one bottle of your flavoured non-carbonated beverages, if you include the manufacturing and agriculture process?  That’s not on the label yet.

Then again, a nice glass of flavoured non-carbonated beverage on a hot day can be quite nice, just so you know…

3 thoughts on “The Pepsi sustainability challenge”

  1. Yes, it is a sad truth that too few plastic bottles get recycled but I think that is a jump to say Pepsi’s new initiative is greenwashing as a result of a lack of consumers’ recycling efforts. Every little step people and companies can do is a good thing. As technology improves to allow companies to use even less plastic, I hope to see them improve their bottles again. And hopefully cities will improve recycling programs and consumers will start actually recycling more.

  2. Jason Bradley

    This is 100% greenwashing! Do some research and you notice that only 15% of bottles get recyled – the other 35 billion bottles end up in the Ocean and landfills.

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