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One energy solution: Converting methane to liquid fuel?

Blue LightUS researchers say they’ve come closer to finding a way to convert methane gas into a more easily transported liquid fuel.

Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is plentiful and more efficient than oil, while producing less pollution. If a low-cost and low-energy way could be found to convert it to liquid form, methane could prove a practical substitute for petroleum-based fuels until renewable fuels become more widely available.

Currently, methane is difficult and costly to transport because it remains a gas at temperatures and pressures typical on the Earth’s surface.

Now, however, scientists at the University of Washington (UW) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) say they’ve moved closer to finding a way to convert methane to methanol or other liquids that can easily be transported, especially from the remote sites where methane is often found. Their findings are published in the Oct. 23 issue of the journal Science.

Methane is valued for its high-energy carbon-hydrogen bonds, which consist of a carbon atom bound to four hydrogen atoms. The gas does not react easily with other materials and so it is most often simply burned as fuel. Burning breaks all four hydrogen-carbon bonds and produces carbon dioxide and water.

Converting methane into useful chemicals, including readily transported liquids, currently requires high temperatures and a lot of energy. Catalysts that turn methane into other chemicals at lower temperatures have been discovered, but they have proven to be too slow, too inefficient or too expensive for industrial applications, according to Karen Goldberg, a chemistry professor at UW.

Binding methane to a metal catalyst is the first step required to selectively break just one of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in the process of converting the gas to methanol or another liquid. In their paper, the researchers describe the first observation of a metal complex that binds methane in solution. This compound serves as a model for other possible methane complexes. In the complex, the methane’s carbon-hydrogen bonds remained intact as they bound to a rare metal called rhodium.

The research should spur further advances in developing catalysts to transform methane into methanol or other liquids, Goldberg said, although she noted that actually developing a process and being able to convert the gas into a liquid chemical at reasonable temperatures still is likely some distance in the future.

“The idea is to turn methane into a liquid in which you preserve most of the carbon-hydrogen bonds so that you can still have all that energy,” she said. “This gives us a clue as to what the first interaction between methane and metal must look like.”

Maurice Brookhart, a UNC chemistry professor, said carbon-hydrogen bonds are very strong and hard to break, but in methane complexes breaking the carbon-hydrogen bond becomes easier.

“The next step is to use knowledge gained from this discovery to formulate other complexes and conditions that will allow us to catalytically replace one hydrogen atom on methane with other atoms and produce liquid chemicals such as methanol,” Brookhart said.

The study was authored by Wesley Bernskoetter of Brown University, who did the work while at UNC, with co-authors Goldberg, Brookhart and Cynthia Schauer, associate chemistry professor at UNC.

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